Trump, Whistle-blowing and a Lesson in Medieval History

By Jing-Zhi Wong Under the US Obama Administration, whistle-blower protections and rewards inflated substantially under the 2010 Dodd-Frank Act.[1] Certain actions under the Act provided monetary rewards payable to eligible whistle-blowers who voluntarily provide original information that leads to successful prosecutions of over $1 million. This has led to several payouts in recent years in excess […]

Nature’s Legal Personality

I’m about to present a very lofty aspiration for International Law, one on recognising nature as a living person. But is this possible and practical? Under new legislation,[1] the Whanganui River in New Zealand became the first major river in the world to be recognised as a living entity. The river was afforded legal personality – the […]

The usefulness of universality in Somali piracy: application to other transnational crimes

Maritime piracy off the coast of Somalis between 2007 and 2011 presented countless challenges to the international community, one of which was defining jurisdiction to enable intervening states to attempt prosecution. First, maritime piracy, defined in Article 101 of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), can be summarised as acts […]