Sea Shepherd – Defenders of International Law?

By Evie Ward Sea Shepherd is a non-profit conservation organisation known throughout the world for their hands-on and sometimes violent approach to the protection of ocean habitats and the creatures within.  While they have missions to defend all ocean creatures great and small, it is not Operation Krill putting them in the news. Causing all […]

The One That Lasted 100 Hours

The legality of war is tricky business. Given the number of potential hotspots erupting (I’m looking at you North Korea), it might be a good time to look back to when it was last done well: the Iraq war. Not that Iraq war, the one before that- the Persian Gulf War of 1991. On August […]

Nature’s Legal Personality

I’m about to present a very lofty aspiration for International Law, one on recognising nature as a living person. But is this possible and practical? Under new legislation,[1] the Whanganui River in New Zealand became the first major river in the world to be recognised as a living entity. The river was afforded legal personality – the […]

In the sledge tracks of Amundsen

14th December is an important date for many reasons. According to Wikipedia, Constantinople was struck by a 6.4 magnitude earthquake in 557, while closer to home, the Seat of Government Surrender Act 1909 (NSW) transferred the Australian Capital Territory from New South Wales to the Commonwealth. However, for polar observers, 14th December 1911 marks the […]