Two Ways to Secede in Life

By Shyamni Chokshi Last Sunday’s Catalan independence vote was one of two such ballots in the last fortnight. The stateless ‘Kurds,’ an ethnic group spread out across the Middle East, conducted their own referendum in Iraq. Both nations’ central governments argue that their constitutions do not allow any part or group within the country to […]

The Good Friday Agreement Gone Bad

By Mike Anderson The 2017 UK General Election saw the fall of a Conservative majority, a resurgent Labour Party, and a Northern Ireland dominated by 2 parties (with one independent): the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) and Sinn Féin. The loss of a majority presents Theresa May’s government with a serious problem: how to maintain government […]

The Quest for South Ledge

By Jing-Zhi Wong The sovereignty over ‘South Ledge’, ‘Pedra Branca’ and ‘Middle Rocks’ were the bones of contention in a dispute referred to the International Court of Justice (ICJ) by Singapore and Malaysia in 2003 by way of Special Agreement.[1] In 2008, while Pedra Branca was awarded to Singapore and Middle Rocks to Malaysia, the […]

Sea Shepherd – Defenders of International Law?

By Evie Ward Sea Shepherd is a non-profit conservation organisation known throughout the world for their hands-on and sometimes violent approach to the protection of ocean habitats and the creatures within.  While they have missions to defend all ocean creatures great and small, it is not Operation Krill putting them in the news. Causing all […]

The One That Lasted 100 Hours

The legality of war is tricky business. Given the number of potential hotspots erupting (I’m looking at you North Korea), it might be a good time to look back to when it was last done well: the Iraq war. Not that Iraq war, the one before that- the Persian Gulf War of 1991. On August […]