West Papua: Postcolonial Colonialism?

Comprising the western half of the island of New Guinea, West Papua is a province on Indonesia’s far eastern frontier that has been in constant turmoil since Indonesian independence from the Netherlands. Having many of the same ingredients needed for a replay of Timor-Leste, it isn’t hard to see why comparisons have been drawn between […]

Nature’s Legal Personality

I’m about to present a very lofty aspiration for International Law, one on recognising nature as a living person. But is this possible and practical? Under new legislation,[1] the Whanganui River in New Zealand became the first major river in the world to be recognised as a living entity. The river was afforded legal personality – the […]

SYRIAN CHEMICAL ATTACK AND INTERNATIONAL LAW

On 4th April 2017, the town of Khan Sheikhoun in Syria was hit by a monstrous chemical attack. At least 70 people, including civilians and medical aid workers, were killed and over 550 men, women and children have been injured making it the deadliest chemical attack since 2013, which occurred just outside Damascus. According to […]

Treatise on Treaties: Government Change and Withdrawal from International Agreements

International treaties are a tricky business. They are essentially contracts between signatory nations. Problems emerge when nations withdraw from or don’t ratify these treaties in the first place. While some treaties do explicitly forbid, or simple do not provide a withdrawal process, we do come to one of the more troublesome points of international law: […]

How to Sue a Nation: Corporation v. Country

As the death bells knell for the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP), a multilateral trade agreement which was (eventually) opposed by every serious US Presidential candidate, many enraged netizens are left hanging with fervent opinions about their country’s obligations to foreign investors. Over the course of this election, America decided that Investor State Dispute Settlements, or ISDS, just […]

The usefulness of universality in Somali piracy: application to other transnational crimes

Maritime piracy off the coast of Somalis between 2007 and 2011 presented countless challenges to the international community, one of which was defining jurisdiction to enable intervening states to attempt prosecution. First, maritime piracy, defined in Article 101 of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), can be summarised as acts […]